How to create and add cool tooltips into web page

May 8, 2009

To create fading tooltips is easy cake.
Here are the steps:

  1. Download MooTools JavaScript framework from it’s website, http://www.mootools.com or you can find it inside this archive.
  2. Include CSS file, tooltips.css.
  3. Include JS file, tooltips.js.
  4. Make sure an image file named bubble.png is in images folder.
  5. And finally you need to add class=”tooltip” and title=”Tooltip Title :: Description goes here” on every HTML object you want to have tooltip on it.

Download the full example here.

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How to Embed Music in a PowerPoint Presentation

December 19, 2008
  1. In PowerPoint, highlight the slide where you want the music to start.
  2. From the menu, choose:

    INSERT > MOVIES AND SOUNDS > SOUND FROM FILE

    Powerpointsound01.jpg

  3. Browse in dialog box to choose music file. Answer “Do you want your sound to play automatically in the slide show?”
  4. You will see a sound icon on your slide. Reposition icon.

    Powerpointsound02.jpg

  5. To adjust playback options, right-click sound icon and choose CUSTOM ANIMATION. Choose EFFECT OPTION from drop-down list.

    Powerpointsound03.jpg

  6. PowerPoint will automatically embed supported sound files up to 100K in size. Files larger than the default setting will be linked, not embedded.
  7. To increase the default to 50,000K in size, choose:

    TOOLS > OPTIONS

    PowerPointSound04.jpg

  8. In the OPTIONS dialog box, select the GENERAL tab. Change 100 Kb to any number up to 50,000 Kb. Click OK.

    PowerPointSound05.jpg

  9. Files larger than the selected size will be linked, not embedded. You must copy linked files with your presentation file to transport your presentation. Embedded sound files are part of your presentation file.

Print Cells to Every Page in Microsoft Excel

November 23, 2008

You may wondering how to create title which able to be shown in every page (not Header).

Here we go..

  1. Click View –> Page Break Preview. Now your active sheet is now divided onto pages.
    Drag blue border line to customize your print area.
  2. Click File –> Page Setup from the menu, clicking the Sheet tab, and telling Excel which row and column titles you want to appear at the top and/or left of every printed page.
  3. Click File–>Print Preview.
  4. Tada! Now you got what do you want.

Good luck and have a nice Excel. 😉


15 Useful Project Management Tools

November 14, 2008

by Cameron Chapman

There is a huge variety of project management applications out there. Most are general purpose apps, not aimed at any one industry. But there is a growing number of project management apps aimed specifically at one industry or another. Applications geared to creative types are becoming more readily available, and some of the offerings are really quite good.

Many of these project management apps have built-in code repositories and subversion browsers (or are built around them). A few have built-in bug and issue tracking. Others include more than just basic project management. All of them can help you keep track of activities and team members. There are both free and paid options. Some have very slick interfaces, and some are modeled more after desktop applications. All are relatively easy to use and easy to set up.

Below are 15 useful project management applications, almost all of which are targeted directly at Web developers, designers (both Web and print) and other creative types. The last one is not geared specifically to creative types but is the most unique project management application I’ve found and is included on that basis as well as because of its potential usefulness for designers and developers.

Also consider our previous article:

1. Basic Project Management Apps

These applications are marketed specifically for project management. Most include things like task-, team-, and goal-management features. Some include additional features such as time tracking and invoicing.

Lighthouse

Lighthouse is a bug- and issue-tracking app that tracks timelines and milestones, integrates with your email client and more. You can update tickets through your inbox, manage your beta testing (by making tickets and milestones public), integrate it with subversion and manage and prioritize your tickets.

Project creation is simple; only a project title and description is required. Once a project is created, tickets, messages and milestones can be entered. Ticket creation can be done by email (the email address to send tickets to is displayed on the “Tickets” page). You can show tickets based on a variety of criteria, including date, state (open or closed) and who is responsible for them. Message creation is easier than email, and you can attach files up to 50 MB in size. When you create a milestone you simply enter the title, the date it’s due and the goals or focus for that particular milestone. It doesn’t get much simpler than that.

Permissions are easy to set, and you can invite users by email. One of the best features of Lighthouse is its Beacon and API integration. With the API, you can customize tickets, projects, changesets, milestones, messages and more. Integrate it with other services (such as Google Calendar), or make desktop applications that use Lighthouse. The APIs make Lighthouse infinitely more useful, because you can really customize it to fit your current workflow.

Lighthouse is great for Web development teams (or individuals) and has a very easy-to-use interface. They have paid and free plans, all of which include unlimited open-source projects. The free plan lets you manage one private project with up to two people on the account. The paid plans range from $10 per month for the Personal plan (with up to 3 projects, 10 users and 100 MB of file upload storage space) to $120 per month for the Platinum plan (with unlimited projects, up to 50 public projects, unlimited users and 30 GB of file upload space).

When combined with a subversion app, Lighthouse provides a pretty complete project management app for developers. Subversion integration is pretty straightforward, and the help file provided gives complete step-by-step instructions for setup.

more…


Hide / Add / Embed your secret files in JPG

October 14, 2008

This the simplest in steganography form (but without any advance protection such as password). But, very tricky way.. 😉

How to doing this?

In Windows:
1. Gather the file you wish to bind, and the image file, and place them in a folder. For example I will be using D:\Celly The image we will be using an example will be mylove.jpg
2. Add the file/files you will be injecting into the image into a WinRar .rar or .zip. From here on this will be referred to as (truelove.rar)
3. Open command prompt by going to Start > Run > cmd
4. In Command Prompt, navigate to the folder where your two files are by typing cd D:\Celly
5. Type copy /b mylove.jpg + truelove.rar ourlove.jpg

In Linux:
I assume that you have understand about path system. Then, just type cat mylove.jpeg truelove.rar > ourlove.jpeg

In order to view/extract your file

In Windows:
1 Change the file extension from ourlove.jpg to ourlove.rar, then open and your file is there
2. Leave the file extension as is, right click, open with WinRar and your file is there..

In Linux:
Simply type this: unrar e ourlove.jpeg

This is a good example: http://img153.imageshack.us/img153/3742/testrj6.jpg

Enjoy! 😉


Rockin’ RSS with PHP on your HTML

October 2, 2008


An RSS feed lets webmasters tease visitors into returning to their websites again and again to check out new content. Danny Wall explains how to set up this simple, automated, spamless way of getting Web surfers to come back for more.

While you may have a good grasp of RSS and what it is, stick with me for just a second and after we run over some preliminary stuff, we’ll move into creating an RSS feed of your own, for your website, using PHP.

RSS (which stands for Really Simple Syndication) is, at its core, a push technology that was developed by Netscape. It gives webmasters the ability to do two things: the first is to easily add content from other websites to their own, and it also easily allows webmasters to push their own unique content out to other people and other websites.

The use that will probably be the most exciting to you is that people who are sick and tired of the mountain of spam filling their inboxes, and tired of having to surf to dozens of sites to get the information they want, are turning to RSS–or more specifically an RSS reader, to obtain news and information on the latest updates to the blogs they follow. An RSS reader (such as the one that can be found at http://www.pluck.com) allows people to see all of the sites they follow in one convenient place and quickly and easily see if there’s anything new–and even what is new.

You can almost think of it as turning the Web into an email application, but without all the spam–because it lets you see which sites have new information in almost the exact same way you know if you’ve read an email or not.

This means that you can add new content to your site, and all of your visitors will know the content has been added and will know what was added. It also means that your own site content can be syndicated across the Web, driving traffic from a huge number of sites directly into your own.

An idea that’s catching on

This concept is so powerful that it is now being picked up and used by the largest players in the Internet news space such as Yahoo!News. It is also used by many blogging services such as Google’s recently acquired Blogger (actually, it uses Atom, but it is essentially the same thing) to keep their loyal readers up to date with new additions to the blogs.

In other words, the format is growing in leaps and bounds, driven not only by the biggest sites on the Web, but also by the cultural wildfire known as the blogosphere.

In the old days, when a Web site had a new update they wanted people to know about, it meant sending out an email, or using an email newsletter. The problem is that in today’s day and age, with many people getting hundreds of spam messages a day, people are block deleting much of their email–including messages they actually asked to receive.

Now, with RSS, it is possible to simply update your website, and the RSS readers that people have installed will automatically tell them an update has happened, what the update was, and give them the ability to quickly and easily surf to your site. No more email, no more worrying if the email you sent even reached the person.

Further, all of that doesn’t even count the ability for other webmasters to add your content to their site with no muss and no fuss (again, syndicating your content across the web).

How–and why–to get started

You should know that there are a lot of tutorials and the like on how to add RSS content to your own site. An excellent one can be found at: http://www.devshed.com/c/a/PHP/Plugging-RDF-Content-Into-Your-Web-Site-With-PHP.

Additionally, there are a wide range of tools to make adding RSS to your site easy with hardly writing any code of you own. I personally use the MagpieRSS toolset created in PHP which can be found at http://magpierss.sourceforge.net. So instead of covering how to get RSS added to your site, what I’d like to do is talk about how you can build your own RSS feed.

Some webmasters that I know groan over the thought of RSS. It’s yet another new technology to learn, another new thing to add to their site and manage. The thing is, RSS is really nothing more than an XML application, and if done right, it doesn’t need any management. Everything can be (indeed, should be) automated.

In fact, RSS it is the first widespread use of XML. It is the first time XML is being used to do something useful for the average Web surfer AND for the average webmaster.

To start with, the easiest thing to do will be to take a look at what an RSS file looks like. You can see an example RSS file at: http://www.wolfdatasystems.com/rss.xml

To anyone with any knowledge of HTML it isn’t really hard to figure out what is going on. There isn’t anything strange or scary, there isn’t anything to make you cringe.

Starting with the header

In fact, using the magic bag of tricks known as PHP, your own RSS file can be automatically created with very little effort, and once the PHP script is finished, the whole thing is “maintenance/management free.”

To provide a little further clarification, we’re going to cover the basics of RSS file creation (indeed, the example file I gave you above is only a basic RSS document). In future articles we’ll talk about other elements to the RSS specification, what they mean, and why you might want to use them (and I’ll provide you the additions to the PHP script you’ll get in this article to add those elements).

For nearly every website, some of the information in the RSS file–lets call it the “header” info–will be the same/static each time the file is created. That info is:

<?xml version=’1.0′ ?>
<rss version=’2.0′>
<channel>
<title>Wolf Data News</title>
<link>http://www.wolfdatasystems.com/</link&gt;
<description>News for programmers, business, and home computer users.</description>
<language>en-us</language>
<docs>http://www.wolfdatasystems.com/rss.xml</docs&gt;

As you can see, this amounts to the very first group of information in the file; and obviously you’ll want your own titles, your own links, and your own “feed description,” but the above will almost certainly be static information in your feed. Every day when my site updates the RSS file, this information is unchanged.

Now, lets go into building the PHP script to create the RSS file. For the sake of discussion, lets call this file create_rss.php:

<?php
// open a file pointer to an RSS file
$fp = fopen (“rss.xml”, “w”);

// Now write the header information
fwrite ($fp, “<?xml version=’1.0′ ?><rss version=’2.0′><channel>”);

fwrite ($fp, “<title>Wolf Data News</title>”);

fwrite ($fp, “<link>http://www.wolfdatasystems.com/</link>&#8221;);

fwrite ($fp, “<description>News for programmers, business, and home computer users.</description>”);

fwrite ($fp, “<language>en-us</language>”);

fwrite ($fp, “<docs>http://www.wolfdatasystems.com/rss.xml</docs>&#8221;);

So far, we haven’t done anything too challenging. All we’ve done is opened a file, and written the header information that won’t be changing from file creation to file creation.

As you can see, I have broken the header file writes into several pieces. I’ve done this simply to make the script easier to see instead of having stuff trailing off to the right side of notepad forever. It isn’t at all necessary, but I do recommend it simply to make it easier to modify the file in the future.

Adding content

At this point, you now need to begin adding the “item” level information; which is simply the content that has been added to your site. Before we get started on this, there are some things you need to know.

Generally, an RSS feed contains not only the most recently added content to your site, but quite a bit of “back” content as well. This is to allow any new users to not only see the most recent additions, but also see what has been done before they picked up your feed. This way, they’ll easily be able to look at that as well.

It’s a good thing for the new user, and for you, as often a person that picks up a new feed will spend some time checking out a lot of the “past” content and catching up on what you’ve got going.

That means we need to do two things.

First, you need to database your new content. In otherwords, you should be adding new content to your database, and your website should be pulling that new content out of the database. This will allow you to utilize PHP with maximum benefit and speed to build the RSS file.

$db = mysql_connect(“localhost”,”your_db_uid”,”your_db_pw”);
mysql_select_db(“db_name”,$db);
$content_sql = “select * from content where page=’index’ order by id desc”;

Obviously in the above line, you are seeing how I do it. Your query may be different depending on how you are databasing your content.

$content_result = mysql_query($content_sql);

So far, we’re still in the “basic” neck of the woods. In fact, all we need to do now is pull the content out of your site and put it into the RSS file.

while ($content_rec = mysql_fetch_row($content_result)) {
fwrite ($pd, “<item>”);

$headline = $content_rec[0];
$content_1 = substr($content_rec[1], 0, 250);
$content = strip_tags($content_1);
if (strlen($content_rec[1]) > 250) {
$content = $content . “….”;
}
fwrite ($fp, “<title>$headline</title>”);
fwrite ($fp, “<description>$content</description>”);
$item_link = “http://www.wolfdatasystems.com/index.php?d=$content_rec%5B3%5D&#8221;;
fwrite ($fp, “<link>$item_link</link>”);

fwrite ($fp, “</item>”);
}

Tease the reader

And essentially that’s it. Notice how I did NOT put the entire content into the RSS feed. You can put the entire content into the file if you want. Personally, I don’t recommend doing this. Instead, put just enough to tease the reader so that they want to visit your site.

Now, you will note that I do move the data around just a bit to not only shorten the length of what I’m sending out on the feed, but also to add the ellipses to let readers know there is more.

And again, how you decide to database your content will affect exactly how you pull that content out.

Anyway, at this point, all we need to do is close off the file.

fwrite ($fd, “</channel></rss>”);
fclose ($fd);

?>

It is a simple enough process. You can now have that ran by a cron job, or simply run the php file from a browser once a day.

Again, if you are running some sort of a content management system (and I’ll talk about how to easily build your own in future articles), creating the RSS file is obviously a simple matter of writing the static “header” information for your site/feed, pulling the content out of the database, writing each item of new content between “<item>” tags, and then closing the file off with the ending tags.

You may want to add in some other information into this feed, and again, we’ll also talk about what other information there is to add, and why you may want to put that into the feed. We’ll also talk about, if you are adding content via RSS feeds to your site, how to make THAT content from that OTHER feed a part of your own RSS feed. This will ensure that you’ve got a constantly updating RSS feed so that people will want to keep coming back to your site, driving up traffic, unique visitors per day, and page views per visitor.

Source: http://www.devshed.com/c/a/PHP/Rockin-RSS-with-PHP-on-your-HTML/


Change localhost to Your Own Domain

October 2, 2008


If you ever thought to change localhost to yourdomain.com, then everything you need is just by following this steps:

  1. Edit C:/WINDOWS/system32/drivers/etc/host
  2. Add your wishes:

    127.0.0.1 localhost
    127.0.0.1 yourdomain.com

  3. Edit C:/Program Files/xampp/apache/conf/extra/httpd-vhosts.conf
  4. Add these to the last lines:

    NameVirtualHost localhost:80
    <VirtualHost localhost:80>
    DocumentRoot e:/xampp/htdocs
    ServerName localhost
    </VirtualHost>

    NameVirtualHost yourdomain.com:80
    <VirtualHost yourdomain.com:80>
    DocumentRoot e:/xampp/htdocs/yourdomain
    ServerName yourdomain.com
    </VirtualHost>

  5. Restart your Apache.
  6. Now try to browse http://yourdomain.com

Good luck 😉